Hancock Adams Room
Welcome to the Massachusetts Room at NSDAR in Washington, D.C.

Let’s retrace history to the Hancock-Clark House in Lexington, Massachusetts, where John Hancock and Samuel Adams were awakened by Paul Revere on April 18, 1775. The men were asleep in “the parlor” of the house built in 1737 by Thomas Hancock for his father Rev. John Hancock. Rev. Hancock was the grandfather of our American patriot and signer of the Declaration of Independence by the same name,  who at seven years of age came to live with his grandfather. The younger John Hancock was later adopted by his uncle Thomas Hancock.  Rev. Jonas Clarke and his wife Lucy Bowes, a cousin of John Hancock, lived in the house from 1752-1805.

Almost 50 years ago, the Massachusetts Daughters of the American Revolution created a replica of the room and we include photos here for your viewing. Our State Regents  and members tirelessly researched the history of the room and found its items.

Virtual Tour
Please take a trip back in history and visit the Massachusetts room through a virtual tour of “a parlor” from the time of the American Revolution.  Enjoy!

Web hyperlinks to non-DAR sites are not the responsibility of the NSDAR, the state organizations, or individual DAR chapters.

The Massachusetts Daughters of the American Revolution website was created and is maintained by Patrice V. Hatcher, state webmaster   
Tall Case Clock
American, 1790-1820.  Marked:  “William Crawford, Oakham” on the face of the clock. Scrolled crest above arched hood, silvered brass dial, four plain free standing columns, scrolled panel on waist, scrolled apron between bracket feet.

Chests
The New England Chest, in carved oak and pine, was made for Mary Burt of Northampton, Massachusetts. She was born in 1695 and married Preserved Marshall in 1716. It is decorated with stylized tulips and comma-like tendrils. It was probably made between 1700 and 1716. Placed on this chest is an authentic Tea Chest which is on loan from the Boston Tea Party Chapter.
Pencil Post Bed and Bed Hangings
Maple, c. 1750-1790.  Octagonally carved posts. Woven rope supports feather mattress, bolster, hand-woven linen sheet,  and quilted woolen coverlet. The bed hangings with valance are modeled after a Lexington example of 1770 using hand-woven and vegetable-dyed fabric hand-sewn by members of the Massachusetts Daughters of the American Revolution.

Gate Leg Table
Maple with pine secondary, 1720, all elements are original. The pewter plates were made in London between 1765-1779 by Burgum and Catcott.
Side Chairs
Late Baroque, cherry - 1750-1800
This site was last updated on July 19, 2016.